Research, Policy, & Advocacy Unit

PRO/PRO/PRO

Pro-Refugee/pro-security/pro-economy


Refuge for those in need, Robust national security, Economically prosperous communities.


 

Pro-Refugee


To be pro-refugee is to be pro-life. It is to recognize and revere the equal humanity and image of God in all people, especially those in greatest need.


To be pro-refugee is to respond with compassion rather than fear and with invitation rather than rejection. It is to acknowledge the crises in the world and not allow the complexities and problems those crises present to keep us from pursuing the flourishing of all people. READ MORE

To be pro-refugee is to respond with compassion rather than fear and with invitation rather than rejection. It is to acknowledge the crises in the world not allowing the complexities and problems those crises present to keep us from pursuing the flourishing of all people. To this end, we espouse our value-set of “people over problems” and “creativity amid complexity.” This means that we value the humanity of all people and do not allow the problems of the world to keep us from responding with compassion. When faced with complexity, we meet it with creativity.

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Pro-Security


Pro-Security means that we are security-conscious in all aspects of refugee resettlement.


We understand that complex issues pertaining to security, both domestically and internationally, are inherent to the Refugee Resettlement Process and believe that a proper security vetting procedure for refugees is vital to sustainable resettlement initiatives. READ MORE

We understand that complex issues pertaining to security, both domestically and internationally, are inherent to the Refugee Resettlement Process and believe that a proper security vetting procedure for refugees is vital to sustainable resettlement initiatives.

Ideally, the process should be apolitical and unbiased – one that is grounded in best practices, and verified by intelligence and security professionals.

Ensuring that refugees who take part in the resettlement process are properly screened not only protects the national security interests of the United States, but also communicates to adversaries or potential attackers that the Resettlement Program is a strategically poor choice for targeting.

Every human-run system will inevitably have areas of vulnerability and places for improvement. Being pro-refugee and pro-security means that we desire to operate a reliable system while regularly searching for vulnerabilities. Developing and instituting mechanisms toward such ends helps ensure that we continue to live out our American values while responsibly evaluating the mechanisms which carry-out such values. Therefore, we support the continuance of the Refugee Resettlement Program while monitoring for areas of improvement. Only when critical system flaws are discovered should the system be paused or halted. When vulnerabilities are found, reasonable, common-sense, non-burdensome and apolitical measures should be applied to the system in order to fix it.

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Pro-Economy


Refugees consistently make a positive and measurable economic impact in communities where they resettle.


Strategically investing in refugees can produce measurable economic gains in local communities. In Europe a study has shown that for every euro invested, there is nearly a two-euro return within five years. That is nearly a 200% economic return on investment. READ MORE

Strategically investing in refugees can produce measurable economic gains in local communities. In Europe a study has shown that  for every euro invested, there is nearly a two-euro return within five years. That is nearly a 200% economic return on investment.

As a proud and powerful nation, it is prudent to look not only to the questions of ethics and security but to the questions of economics and fiscal policy as well. In that, a foremost principle for SEEK is rewriting the narrative of fear and vulnerability that many feel when confronting the reality of refugee resettlement in his or her host country in part due to the reality and necessity of successful economic policy. Many incorrectly hold that the host country simply can’t handle the strain of weighty refugee populations, depleting ever-diminishing government resources home and abroad. Even further, the level of fear and vulnerability of worker or business owner that his or her wage or product is at risk plays into political considerations when confronting refugee crises. Official spokesperson for the UN’s High Commissioner for Refugees Melissa Fleming put it this way: “It can be very hard to welcome strangers when you’re made to feel threatened. Even if those strangers are more vulnerable than you.” Any perceived threat – economic or otherwise – may be more persuasive than a remote physical threat. (“Our livelihood, our families are on the line.”) The solution? It lies in the data. There is growing and formidable data that shows just the opposite is true of this pervasive negative narrative: Refugees can contribute politically and economically not only to their host home, but to their home countries – even in protracted resettlement situations. Economic data put out by World Bank suggests that even in countries with a high refugee-to-population percentage, certain economic drivers “have exhibited either improved or stabilized performance” – in anything from agricultural to tourism sectors – with the massive influx of refugees in the past years. Even sectors with human or physical capital – like landlords or retail stores – may show little impact at all, and at times, even demonstrate gains. There is an influx of capital – both monetary and skills-based – that these populations bring, and SEEK’s efforts to foster their stabilization and self-sufficiency translates to economic consumers and contributors. Education and self-stability programs for these refugee populations translates not only to a stable economy, but a smarter consumer at home – and abroad.

The data speaks to a larger economic ripple than just in the host country. As Professor Alexander Betts, director of the Refugee Studies Centre at Oxford University, said so succinctly, “How we treat these refugees in exile will shape their ability to determine the political trajectory of their countries of origin.” And a political trajectory unequivocally effects the economic – good and bad. SEEK’s work with refugee populations can find positive focus economically home and abroad with the continued fostering of positive refugee resettlement programs experiences and results. There is no longer the need to chose between the ethical and moral and the pragmatic. We are a nation that welcomes refugees and one that will benefit as a result.

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OUR ADVOCACY WORK

Legislative Advocacy

Through local, regional, and national advocacy with Members of Congress, SEEK promotes State and National policies and legislation that support our pro-refugee / pro-security / pro-economy (PRO/PRO/PRO) agenda.

Equipping and Mobilizing Citizen Advocates

We equip and mobilize “citizen advocates” who are concerned with the plight of refugees to organize in order to use their voice, their social networks and speak directly to their elected officials on behalf of refugees.

Equipping and Mobilizing Refugee Advocates

SEEK provides a platform and training to empower refugees and displaced peoples to act as their own advocates. Refugees are encouraged to share their story and speak for their rights to people in power while making their recommendations for change.

Inter-group and Inter-religious Coalition Building

Through establishing important local and global alliances among diverse organizational, ethnic, and religious groups, SEEK builds coalitions to advance issues of common concern.

Become an Advocate


The Advocacy Tool Kit

Our advocacy tool kit is designed to empower and assist everyday peacemakers as they live out the call to become agents of peace and advocates for justice. We have assembled the necessary elements to strategically engaging one’s State and US legislators and other elected officials. As principled citizens of a constitutional democracy we believe it is critical to be fluent in the ways and norms of speaking truth to power. In the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” So join us as we advocate for the legal representation of mutual humanity and common dignity of all people.

Know The Issues


  1. Get familiar with our PRO/PRO/PRO framework
  2. See the Refugee Policy Section and review the current anti-refugee bills and legislation along with our commentary

Find Your Legislators


State Legislators   | .  US Legislators

Use Your Voice


SEND A LETTER/EMAIL

Download and edit a sample letter

 

MAKE A CALL

Download a sample statement

 

GO SOCIAL

Make a simple video testimonial and post online

Take a photo of your letter and post it online

Write a short statement on FB and Twitter

Attend an Advocacy Workshop


See available dates

Build an Advocacy Team


Start a SEEK advocacy team at your school, university, or in your social network. It’s easy to get started and its never been more important.

 

  1. Download our Advocacy Team Pack
  2. Contact potential Team members and host a meeting
  3. Commit to meeting at least once a month
  4. Get creative in speaking truth to power.

 

Email us for more information on how to get started.

Refugee Policy

State-level Policy –

Coming Soon

U.S. Policy –

Coming Soon

European Policy –

Coming Soon

United Nations Policy –

Coming Soon

International Policy –

Coming Soon

Policy Reports


COMING SOON